Looking at the number of drafts submitted for project reports in the Advanced Lab

In this post I take a quick look at the number of drafts of their project papers that students submitted in my January 2012 Advanced Lab course. This course had a minimum bar for the paper grades and the students were allowed to revise and resubmit as many times as needed to get there, with an average of 3.22 drafts needed. I decided to look at these numbers for the purpose of communicating realistic expectations to students currently registered for my fall section of the course and thought I would share those numbers.

I am starting to prepare for my fall Advanced Lab course. Here is a quick overview of this course from a previous post:

This type of course, a standard course in most physics departments, is a standalone lab course without any associated lecture course. There is an amazing amount of variability from one Advanced Lab course to the next and they range in format from one experiment per week with everything already set up and cookbook procedures ready to be followed, to a single student-developed project over the entire term (or year!).

In my specific incarnation, we spend the first month doing some introductory activities to build up some foundational skills which are mostly related to data analysis and presentation. For the rest of the course pairs of students work on two month-long experimental physics projects. The students are guided to work on projects that can be viewed as being part of a larger research line, where they build on the work of previous students and future students will build on their work. Thus no two groups will ever perform identical experiments.

A major piece of the course is that they have to write a journal-style article to communicate the results of one of their projects. To help them practice revising their own writing and impress upon them that effective writing requires many revisions, I require that students earn a grade equivalent to a B on their paper according to this rubric, and are allowed to revise and resubmit as many times as needed to reach that threshold grade.

The overall grade for these papers was calculated as 25% from the first graded draft and 75% from the final draft. They were allowed to submit an initial draft, which was not graded, where I would spend a maximum of a half an hour reading over the paper and providing feedback. Students were encouraged to have a peer read through their paper and provide some feedback before submitting this initial draft. After reaching the threshold B-grade, they were allowed to resubmit one final draft. At some point in the revision process I also had a formal process where students provided each other with some peer feedback on their papers.

A quick summary of the numbers are in order. Of the twelve students, three of them gave up at some point before reaching threshold B-grade on the journal-style article. Those students were only given partial credit for the last grade that their paper received. Of the nine students whose papers reached the threshold B-grade, five of them submitted a final draft to improve their overall paper grade.

Of the 9 papers that were accepted (met the minimum grade threshold of a B), 5 of them were revised at least one additional time .

The number of drafts in this graph includes the initial ungraded draft, but does not include the final revision that 5 of 9 students submitted after their papers reached the B-grade threshold.

What is the take-home message here? Based on this system, students should expect to submit three or more drafts of a paper in order to meet the threshold grade.

This coming fall, I plan to adopt some new feedback strategies that  take the focus off grammatical correctness and similar issues in the hopes to focus more on the ideas in the papers. As part of this, I may move to a reviewer report style of feedback (for example, this is the one for AJP) and away from detailed rubrics, but I haven’t quite made up my mind on this yet. My grading philosophy in the course this fall will be that their course grade will represent the quality of the recommendation that I would give them in a reference letter based on their work in the course, and I want to do my best to make sure all of the individual components are assessed in ways that match up with this overall grading philosophy.

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How do YOU give students credit for the scope of their projects

In my Advanced Laboratory course my students are just about to submit the first drafts of their papers on their first of two projects (the whole course is essentially two projects after some initial introductory activities).

In this course I try to tailor the challenge-level of each project to the ability level of the students in each group. And their grade for each project is mostly based on the quality of the dissemination of their work, and their level of understanding of their project as assessed by their written report, their presentations at the weekly research group meetings and an oral assessment given at the end of their project.

But there is nothing explicit in my evaluation scheme that rewards students for tackling challenging projects or penalizes them for shooting really low. I tend to be more generous with my rubrics for students that have taken on the challenging projects, but I feel like I would like something built into the overall evaluation scheme.

So my question to you dear blog reader is how do you give students credit for the scope of challenge-level of their projects?